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FAQs
 

Q: How do I obtain an SDS (Safety Data Sheet)?

A: Please  e-mail your request for information to info@clisyntec.com or use the online request form.

Q: Is the refractometer reading the same number as the dilution/concentration percentage?

A: Not necessarily. It is important to note that each coolant has its own unique concentration readings. One coolant may have a refractometer reading of 9.2°Bx at 10% concentration (10:1) while another coolant may read 3.3°Bx at the same concentration. Water-soluble oils typically have the highest refractometer scales and synthetic coolants typically have the lowest. Make sure to check with your coolant manufacturer for the correct scale for your coolant.

Q: Why do most lubricants fail when forming or drawing AHSS materials?

A: When forming or drawing a part from AHSS materials, it is critical for the lubricant to have both lubricity and surface tension. Petroleum-based products have lubricity, but they typically lack the ability to retain surface tension. In other words, the petroleum-based lubricant does not stay at the point of heat and friction as the part is being formed. More often than not, it runs away from the heat or it is squeegeed ahead of the form. By its chemistry, it is unable to stay at the point where it is needed the most – at the point of heat and extreme pressure.

Consultant Lubricants has developed a stamping lubricant for AHSS materials that retains both lubricity and surface tension. By its unique chemistry, our lubricant is drawn to the heat and the point of extreme pressure. See the products page.

Q: Is the Price-per-Gallon the same as Price-at-the-Machine?

A: Not necessarily. Price-per-Gallon, which typically refers to the retail price of a product, does not necessarily reflect the cost of a product when in production. Many products are sold in a concentrate that requires diluting with water before use. Price-at-the-Machine is a more accurate measurement of the cost of a product in use than the Price-per-Gallon purchase price.

For example, one gallon of concentrate that sells for $20.00/gallon but is diluted 8:1 (8 parts water to 1 part concentrate) has a Price-at-the-Machine of $2.23 ($20.00 divided by 9 parts). One gallon of a product that sells for $10.00/gallon but is diluted 2:1 (2 parts water to 1 part product) has a Price-at-the-Machine of $3.34 ($10.00 divided by 3 parts).

Q: All things being equal, what is the TRUE COST of a lubricant/coolant product?

A: The true cost of a product takes into consideration the impact of that product on other aspects of production. Poorly performing products can add costs, such as: shortened die coating life, shortened tool life, production down time for maintenance and repair, personnel costs, shorter sump life, defective parts, high scrap rate, etc.

Q: How do we protect the profitability of a part that we’re manufacturing?

A: Protecting the profitability is directly related to problem solving. Problems that arise in production can quickly cut into the calculated profitability of a part. Typically, manufacturers calculate 10-12% of the “piece price” for tooling, maintenance and repair costs. That percentage can quickly be chewed up by unanticipated costs (such as, shortened die coating and tool life, re-coating, polishing, increased down time, high scrap rate, etc.) from production problems.

Q: How do we increase the profitability of a part that we’re manufacturing?

A: Increasing the profitability is directly related to improving efficiencies. If any area of the production process can be made more efficient, it will positively impact calculated profitability of a part. Typically, manufacturers calculate 10-12% of the “piece price” for tooling, maintenance and repair costs. That percentage can be reduced by improved efficiencies (such as, lengthening die coating and tool life, less frequent re-coating and polishing, decreased down time, lower scrap rate, etc.) in the production process.

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